all things sustainably considered

Jul 04

[video]

Jul 01

laughingsquid:

Moment, An App That Automatically Tracks How Much You Use Your Phone

laughingsquid:

Moment, An App That Automatically Tracks How Much You Use Your Phone

[video]

laughingsquid:

The EKOCYCLE Cube, A 3D Printer That Uses Post-Consumer Waste Like Plastic Bottles as Printing Material

laughingsquid:

The EKOCYCLE Cube, A 3D Printer That Uses Post-Consumer Waste Like Plastic Bottles as Printing Material

Jun 22

laughingsquid:

Home Automation Company Nest Is Acquiring the Dropcam Cloud-Based Video Monitoring Service

laughingsquid:

Home Automation Company Nest Is Acquiring the Dropcam Cloud-Based Video Monitoring Service

Jun 15

thesmithian:

ucresearch:

In 1942 a young African American Ph.D. in mathematics, David Blackwell, interviewed for a teaching job at Berkeley. He was hired, but not for many years.
When finally invited to join the statistics faculty in 1952, several of Blackwell’s new colleagues told him there was a backstory to his failed application a decade earlier. It had been decided to offer him a position in mathematics, they said, but the wife of the departmental chair, who sometimes invited the faculty to dinner, insisted she would not have a black person in her house — and the offer was squelched.
Blackwell, who eventually became the first tenured black professor in the University of California system, shares this vivid memory in a 10-hour interview with the Bancroft Library’s Regional Oral History Office (ROHO). His life history is part of a recently completed oral-history series on 18 pioneering African American faculty and senior administrators, hired before the advent of affirmative-action policies in the 1970s, who broke barriers and laid the groundwork for those who followed.
Read more →

[look of the hour]

thesmithian:

ucresearch:

In 1942 a young African American Ph.D. in mathematics, David Blackwell, interviewed for a teaching job at Berkeley. He was hired, but not for many years.

When finally invited to join the statistics faculty in 1952, several of Blackwell’s new colleagues told him there was a backstory to his failed application a decade earlier. It had been decided to offer him a position in mathematics, they said, but the wife of the departmental chair, who sometimes invited the faculty to dinner, insisted she would not have a black person in her house — and the offer was squelched.

Blackwell, who eventually became the first tenured black professor in the University of California system, shares this vivid memory in a 10-hour interview with the Bancroft Library’s Regional Oral History Office (ROHO). His life history is part of a recently completed oral-history series on 18 pioneering African American faculty and senior administrators, hired before the advent of affirmative-action policies in the 1970s, who broke barriers and laid the groundwork for those who followed.

Read more

[look of the hour]

Jun 12

thisiscitylab:


It may seem quixotic or pointless to try to save the Kentile sign when so much of New York’s social and physical infrastructure is being dismantled. It may seem ridiculous to treasure an advertisement for a product that contained a harmful substance. It may seem presumptuous to try to require a private property owner to preserve a defunct piece of infrastructure for an admittedly ephemeral public good. But lots of people want to try.
"Words have power, letters have power," says Savage. "That’s how you claim something. It’s something we can share that has public meaning. I’m thinking of it as a monument. It’s something that symbolizes all these things. It carries all the weight of the culture. I think it is the de facto logo of Brooklyn."

-Can Anyone Save Brooklyn’s Kentile Floors Sign? Should They?
[A. Strakey/Flickr]

thisiscitylab:

It may seem quixotic or pointless to try to save the Kentile sign when so much of New York’s social and physical infrastructure is being dismantled. It may seem ridiculous to treasure an advertisement for a product that contained a harmful substance. It may seem presumptuous to try to require a private property owner to preserve a defunct piece of infrastructure for an admittedly ephemeral public good. But lots of people want to try.

"Words have power, letters have power," says Savage. "That’s how you claim something. It’s something we can share that has public meaning. I’m thinking of it as a monument. It’s something that symbolizes all these things. It carries all the weight of the culture. I think it is the de facto logo of Brooklyn."

-Can Anyone Save Brooklyn’s Kentile Floors Sign? Should They?

[A. Strakey/Flickr]

Jun 11

#WednesdayWisdom

nasdaq:

Felix Baumgartner inspires us to push our limits. #WednesdayWisdom

image

(via forbes)

wefuckinglovescience:

This pen can scan any color in the world using a sensor and then matches it exactly using a five-color ink cartridge.
More info: http://bit.ly/1hMaPlx

wefuckinglovescience:

This pen can scan any color in the world using a sensor and then matches it exactly using a five-color ink cartridge.

More info:

thisiscitylab:

Where bikes get stolen in San Francisco.
[Map: Seismograph]

thisiscitylab:

Where bikes get stolen in San Francisco.

[Map: Seismograph]